AP Social Studies

Central Academy currently offers the following Advanced Placement social studies courses:

AP American History – The scope and sequence of this course mirrors the college-level US History course; however, AP students are required to study college-level primary and secondary sources and develop skills to write succinct yet carefully documented essays.

Prerequisites: Successful completion (A or B average) in Academy Social Studies. New students to the Academy must have an A in the previously offered advanced level social science course or permission of the instructor.

High School Credit: 1 US History (weighted course)

Enrollment in the following DMACC Courses:
HIS 150 American History 1492-1877 4 credits (F)
HIS 153 American History 1877-present 4 credits (S)


AP European History – This course surveys European history from 1450 AD to the present. Organized along a chronological format, major themes are investigated which include the evolution of democratic and capitalistic systems, social history, women’s studies, conflict resolution, philosophy and fine arts, and the roles of religion, science, and technology in European society. Skills stressed include formal essay writing, critical thinking, working with primary and secondary sources, and reading college-level materials for comprehension and analysis.

Prerequisites: Successful completion (A or B average) in Academy Social Studies. New students to the Academy must have an A in advanced level World History or permission of the instructor.

High School Credit: 1 World History (weighted course)

Enrollment in the following DMACC Course:
HIS 113 Western Civ: Early Modern to Present 4 Credits (S)


AP World History – This is a course of study equivalent to an introductory college course in world history. It develops greater understanding of the evolution of global processes, contacts, and interaction with different types of human societies from 1000 AD to the present. The course highlights the nature of changes in international frameworks and their causes and consequences, as well as comparisons among major societies, developments that illustrate major themes and relationships between major civilizations in Asia, Africa, Europe and the Americas are explored. These themes include the impact of interaction among societies through trade, war and diplomacy; the impact of technology and demography on people and the environment; systems of social structure and gender changes in function and structures of states and in attitudes toward state and political identities.

Prerequisites: World Civilizations & Humanities or advanced level social science course. Evidence of advanced student writing skills. Teacher recommendation.

High School Credit: 1 World History (weighted course)

Enrollment in the following DMACC Courses:
HIS 112 Western Civ: Ancient to Early Modern 4 credits (F)
HIS 113 Western Civ: Early Modern to Present 4 credits (S)